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short story n edgar allan poe..
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GPN
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Post short story n edgar allan poe.. Reply with quote
ung LIGEIA... wahahah!! pmpawala ng antok... pmptubo ng nerbyos... tenkz poh...
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vapir no2


Last edited by GPN on Fri Feb 04, 2011 1:36 am; edited 1 time in total
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JHL
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nyahaha...

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Maya
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i think meron ako nyan,. hanapin ko po muna
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ferdinand_lozada
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"Ligeia" is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe. Irish critic and playwright George Bernard Shaw said, "The story of the Lady Ligeia is not merely one of the wonders of literature: it is unparalleled and unapproached."

Plot summary
The unnamed narrator describes the qualities of Ligeia, a beautiful, passionate and intellectual woman, raven-haired and dark-eyed, that he thinks he remembers meeting "in some large, old decaying city near the Rhine." They marry, but after a few years Ligeia dies; the narrator, grief-stricken, moves to England where he buys and refurbishes an abbey. He soon enters into a loveless marriage with "the fair-haired and blue-eyed Lady Rowena Trevanion, of Tremaine."

In the second month of the marriage, Rowena begins to suffer from worsening fever and anxiety. One night, when she is about to faint, the narrator pours her a goblet of wine. Drugged with opium, he sees (or thinks he sees) drops of "a brilliant and ruby colored fluid" fall into the goblet. Her condition rapidly worsens, and a few days later she dies and her body is wrapped for burial.

As the narrator keeps vigil overnight, he notices a brief return of colour to Rowena's cheeks. She repeatedly shows signs of reviving, before relapsing into apparent death. As he attempts resuscitation, the revivals become progressively stronger, but the relapses more final. As dawn breaks, and the narrator is sitting emotionally exhausted from the night's struggle, the shrouded body stands and walks into the middle of the room. When he touches the figure, its head bandages fall away to reveal masses of raven hair and dark eyes: Rowena has transformed into Ligeia.

It was first published in the September 18, 1838 edition of American Museum Magazine, and was edited by two of Poe's friends, Dr. N.C. Brooks and Dr. J. E. Snodgrass. The magazine paid Poe $10 for "Ligeia" and "The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym," the writer's first and only attempt at a full-length novel.

Ligeia was extensively revised throughout its publication history. It was reprinted in Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque (1840), the one volume of Phantasy Pieces (1842), and Tales by Edgar Allan Poe (1845), the New York World (February 15, 1845), and the Broadway Journal (September 27, 1845). The poem "The Conqueror Worm" was first incorporated into the text as a poem composed by Ligeia in the New York World.

Ligeia, the narrator tells us, is extremely intelligent, "such as I have never known in a woman." Most importantly, she served as the narrator's teacher in "metaphysical investigation," passing on "wisdom too divinely precious not to be forbidden!" So, her knowledge in mysticism, combined with an intense desire for life may have lead to her revival.

However, the revelation that the Lady Rowena has transformed into the dead Lady Ligeia is only evidenced in the words of the narrator, leaving room to question its validity. The narrator has already been established as an opium addict. In fact, perhaps tellingly, the narrator early in the story describes Ligeia's beauty as "the radiance of an opium-dream." He also tells us that "in the excitement of my opium dreams, I would call aloud upon her name, during the silence of the night... as if... I could restore her to the pathway she had abandoned... upon the earth." This may be interpreted as evidence that Ligeia's return was nothing more than a drug-induced hallucination.

The poem within the story, "The Conqueror Worm," also leads to some questioning of Ligeia's alleged resurrection. The poem essentially shows Ligeia's belief that life's only meaning is to feed the worms while in the grave, an admittance of her own inevitable mortality. The inclusion of the bitter poem may have been meant to be ironic or a parody of the convention at the time, both in literature and in life. In the mid-19th century it was common to emphasize the sacredness of death and the beauty of dying (consider Charles Dickens's Little Johnny character in Our Mutual Friend and or the death of Helen Burns in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre). Instead, Ligeia speaks of fear personified in the "blood-red thing."


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Sat Jun 02, 2007 5:08 pm View user's profile Send private message AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
ice
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ferdinand_lozada wrote:
"Ligeia" is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe. Irish critic and playwright George Bernard Shaw said, "The story of the Lady Ligeia is not merely one of the wonders of literature: it is unparalleled and unapproached."

Plot summary
The unnamed narrator describes the qualities of Ligeia, a beautiful, passionate and intellectual woman, raven-haired and dark-eyed, that he thinks he remembers meeting "in some large, old decaying city near the Rhine." They marry, but after a few years Ligeia dies; the narrator, grief-stricken, moves to England where he buys and refurbishes an abbey. He soon enters into a loveless marriage with "the fair-haired and blue-eyed Lady Rowena Trevanion, of Tremaine."

In the second month of the marriage, Rowena begins to suffer from worsening fever and anxiety. One night, when she is about to faint, the narrator pours her a goblet of wine. Drugged with opium, he sees (or thinks he sees) drops of "a brilliant and ruby colored fluid" fall into the goblet. Her condition rapidly worsens, and a few days later she dies and her body is wrapped for burial.

As the narrator keeps vigil overnight, he notices a brief return of colour to Rowena's cheeks. She repeatedly shows signs of reviving, before relapsing into apparent death. As he attempts resuscitation, the revivals become progressively stronger, but the relapses more final. As dawn breaks, and the narrator is sitting emotionally exhausted from the night's struggle, the shrouded body stands and walks into the middle of the room. When he touches the figure, its head bandages fall away to reveal masses of raven hair and dark eyes: Rowena has transformed into Ligeia.

It was first published in the September 18, 1838 edition of American Museum Magazine, and was edited by two of Poe's friends, Dr. N.C. Brooks and Dr. J. E. Snodgrass. The magazine paid Poe $10 for "Ligeia" and "The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym," the writer's first and only attempt at a full-length novel.

Ligeia was extensively revised throughout its publication history. It was reprinted in Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque (1840), the one volume of Phantasy Pieces (1842), and Tales by Edgar Allan Poe (1845), the New York World (February 15, 1845), and the Broadway Journal (September 27, 1845). The poem "The Conqueror Worm" was first incorporated into the text as a poem composed by Ligeia in the New York World.

Ligeia, the narrator tells us, is extremely intelligent, "such as I have never known in a woman." Most importantly, she served as the narrator's teacher in "metaphysical investigation," passing on "wisdom too divinely precious not to be forbidden!" So, her knowledge in mysticism, combined with an intense desire for life may have lead to her revival.

However, the revelation that the Lady Rowena has transformed into the dead Lady Ligeia is only evidenced in the words of the narrator, leaving room to question its validity. The narrator has already been established as an opium addict. In fact, perhaps tellingly, the narrator early in the story describes Ligeia's beauty as "the radiance of an opium-dream." He also tells us that "in the excitement of my opium dreams, I would call aloud upon her name, during the silence of the night... as if... I could restore her to the pathway she had abandoned... upon the earth." This may be interpreted as evidence that Ligeia's return was nothing more than a drug-induced hallucination.

The poem within the story, "The Conqueror Worm," also leads to some questioning of Ligeia's alleged resurrection. The poem essentially shows Ligeia's belief that life's only meaning is to feed the worms while in the grave, an admittance of her own inevitable mortality. The inclusion of the bitter poem may have been meant to be ironic or a parody of the convention at the time, both in literature and in life. In the mid-19th century it was common to emphasize the sacredness of death and the beauty of dying (consider Charles Dickens's Little Johnny character in Our Mutual Friend and or the death of Helen Burns in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre). Instead, Ligeia speaks of fear personified in the "blood-red thing."




ang liit eh ayan napalaki ko na ... teka mabasa nga
Blue_PDT_01_12 Blue_PDT_01_12 Blue_PDT_01_12

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ferdinand_lozada
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nICE Blue_PDT_01_11
Sat Jun 02, 2007 9:50 pm View user's profile Send private message AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
ice
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ferdinand_lozada wrote:
nICE Blue_PDT_01_11



wel achualy dah tapic es inner-risting surli inner-resting stow-ri



Blue_PDT_01_12 Blue_PDT_01_12 Blue_PDT_01_12

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Sat Jun 02, 2007 10:45 pm View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
ferdinand_lozada
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cOOl Blue_PDT_01_11
Sat Jun 02, 2007 10:49 pm View user's profile Send private message AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
ice
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ferdinand_lozada wrote:
cOOl Blue_PDT_01_11




nIce



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tanom
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ferdinand_lozada wrote:
cOOl Blue_PDT_01_11

ferdie, close karin pala sa literature things na yan? aheheheh

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